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If you spot a security flaw, tell CERT NZ Neil Sanson
4 August 2017

cert NZ

Computer systems always seem to have problems and vulnerabilities. Some data breaches occur because of those vulnerabilities. If you spot a vulnerability or security flaw in a website, you can first report it to the organisation. They are generally happy to hear about a problem, so they can fix it.

How much can I charge for information? Sam Grover
4 August 2017

money image blog

Charging for information is a subject that comes up in complaints made to us from time to time.

When governments get data protection wrong Charles Mabbett
2 August 2017

The Great Wave off Kanagawa crop

“I’m from the government and I’m here to help.” The former US President Ronald Reagan famously said these were the “nine most terrible words in the English language” that anyone could expect to hear.

Williams v ACC: Getting the information right Jane Foster
25 July 2017

goldfinch

A recent Human Rights Review Tribunal decision has highlighted the importance of agencies complying with privacy principle 8 (the accuracy principle) and ensuring they take reasonable steps to ensure the information is accurate and up-to-date before they use it.

Are you our next Team Manager (Policy and Technology)? JLB
24 July 2017

policies

If you are looking for a new team leadership opportunity and you’re a shoo-in when it comes to interest in privacy issues, check us out! We’re looking for a Team Manager (Policy and Technology) to lead our policy team of five.

Why has my information been withheld? Shaun Ritchie
19 July 2017

Lock and Key

The Privacy Act gives you the right to request access to information about you (see principle 6). That right to access your personal information is essential if you want to maintain some understanding and control over who knows what about you. Your right of access is strong, and does not require you to provide reasons for wanting information.

Can I tell the cops? A guide for health professionals Richard Stephen
7 July 2017

Doctor examining a patient2

In their job, health professionals have to look after some of the most intimate details of their patients’ lives. This is a great responsibility, and patients trust and expect doctors, nurses and others to not just tell anyone. This obligation is recognised in the Health Information Privacy Code.

What do I do if I think a child is at risk? Sam Grover
6 July 2017

box 1869498 960 720

If you think a child is at risk, can you tell someone? This video spells out the answer to this question: yes. If you think a child is at risk, tell a police officer, social worker or someone else who can help. You won’t get into trouble.